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HAZWOPER

The Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Standard (HAZWOPER) applies to five distinct groups of employers and their employees. This includes any employees who are exposed or potentially exposed to hazardous substances -- including hazardous waste -- and who are engaged in one of the following operations as specified by 1910.120(a)(1)(i-v) and 1926.65(a)(1)(i-v):

  • Clean-up operations -- required by a governmental body, whether federal, state, local, or other involving hazardous substances -- That are conducted at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites;

  • Corrective actions involving clean-up operations at sites covered by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) as amended (42 U.S.C. 6901 et seq.);

  • Voluntary clean-up operations at sites recognized by federal, state, local, or other governmental body as uncontrolled hazardous waste sites;

  • Operations involving hazardous wastes that are conducted at treatment, storage, and disposal facilities regulated by Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 264 and 265 pursuant to RCRA, or by agencies under agreement with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to implement RCRA regulations; and

  • Emergency response operations for releases of, or substantial threats of releases of, hazardous substances regardless of the location of the hazard.

RIGGING AND SIGNAL PERSON

A qualified rigger is a rigger who meets the criteria for a qualified person. A qualified rigger must therefore:

  • Possess a recognized degree, certificate, or professional standing, or have extensive knowledge, training, and experience, and

  • Successfully demonstrate the ability to solve problems related to rigging loads.

A qualified rigger must be able to properly rig the load for a particular job. He or she need not be qualified to do every type of rigging job. Each load that requires rigging has unique properties that can range from the simple to the complex. However, previous experiences does not automatically qualify the rigger to rig unstable, unusually heavy, or eccentric loads that may require a tandem lift, multiple lifts, or use of custom rigging equipment. In essence, employers must make sure that the person can do the rigging work needed for the exact types of loads and lifts for a particular job with the equipment and rigging that will be used for that job.

A signal person must:

  • Know and understand the type of signals used;

  • Be competent in the application of the type of signals used;

  • Have a basic understanding of equipment operation and limitations, including the crane dynamics involved in swinging and stopping loads and boom deflection from hoisting loads; and

  • Know and understand the relevant requirements of the provisions of the standard relating to signals.

SILICA AWARENESS

This course will identify the basic health hazards associated with exposure to silica and respirable crystalline silica dust, some of the common construction tasks that could result in exposure to respirable crystalline, and typical control measures employers may implement to protect workers from exposure to silica and respirable crystalline silica including engineering controls, work practices, and respirators.

Additionally, you will learn about contents of the new OSHA regulation concerning silica and respirable crystalline silica and where to get a copy of the regulation, be able to recognize who and what a competent person is and the basic requirements surrounding OSHA’s new Respirable Crystalline Silica standard (e.g. exposure limits, housekeeping, written exposure control plan, medical monitoring, training and recordkeeping).

HAZWOPER/ HAZWOPER REFRESHER/ NOA

8-HOUR RIGGING & SIGNAL PERSON

SILICA AWARENESS